Planning & Investment Knowledge Base

Activity Management Continuous Improvement Cycle

Introduction

All Approved Organisations maintain an Activity Management Plan (AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
), this process provides guidance for the continuous update and improvement of these plans as living documents, and the transition to business case principles. Transition to a business case framework may occur gradually over a period of time as activity management plans are reviewed and updated.

 

Overview information

The transition to a business case approach within the NZ Transport Agency provides the opportunity for guidance which signals expectations for transition of the existing AMPs to using the business case principles, and NZTA investment assessment to support the AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
. This also requires an understanding of how AMPs sit within the overall investment allocation process.

 

AMPs include a significant amount of information which contributes to the management of the asset and network, but which is not required by the NZTA to evaluate investment decisions. As a result the Transport Agency will consider support for an AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
based on a subset of the strategic information and not the detail.

 

The Planning Improvement Cycle process map provides a representation of the process for maintaining and developing an AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
(within the business case approach), including the role the document has within the overall investment and assessment framework. It is flexible to reflect individual scale, complexity and risks faced by each Approved Organisation.

 

This framework describes Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. for roading networks, however the framework is also directly applicable to Public Transport Activity Management Plans (Regional Public Transport Plans (RPTP A plan which specifies how the regional council intends to give effect to the public transport service components of the regional land transport plan that applies to the region. As of June 2013, the contents and management of the plan is defined by Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003. )).

 

Application of the business case principles should not result in an overhaul of the existing document and practices, but should augment the existing AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
guidelines (such as NAMs) to provide investment confidence for the NZTA. The following summarises how the current AMPs are represented within a Business Case Approach.

 

Strategic Case

The strategic case Is the proposal aligned with the organisation’s strategic context and plans?  The strategic case determines whether or not an investment is needed. It demonstrates the case for change and the strategic assessment of evidence, i.e. how the proposal will further the aims and objectives of the organisation.  represents the context and case for change if variation is needed – it is the Approved Organisation’s depiction of the current state, including the assumptions which underpin this and the outcomes targeted. The strategic case, comprising a strategic assessment The Strategic Assessment uses robust tools and methodology to determine quickly and at low cost:


• what the problem is and whether it has a consequence that needs to be addressed;
• what outcomes will be gained from any potential investment;
• what potential benefits will arise from investing, and;
• whether there is stakeholder agreement to proceed or not to proceed.
These are most often answered using a Problem and Consequences workshop and a Outcomes and Benefits workshop.
and strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

It includes:
the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


* underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

* the proposing organisation’s objectives.
, will explain why investment is needed.

 

The strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

It includes:
the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


* underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

* the proposing organisation’s objectives.
takes into account the assumptions of the future, the organisation’s objectives , and underlying or umbrella strategic documents (such as the GPS A Government Policy Statement on Land Transport Funding issued under section 86 of the LTMA or regional strategies) to position the outcomes sought against wider national, regional and district outcomes.

 

The strategic assessment The Strategic Assessment uses robust tools and methodology to determine quickly and at low cost:


• what the problem is and whether it has a consequence that needs to be addressed;
• what outcomes will be gained from any potential investment;
• what potential benefits will arise from investing, and;
• whether there is stakeholder agreement to proceed or not to proceed.
These are most often answered using a Problem and Consequences workshop and a Outcomes and Benefits workshop.
ensures that the problems, opportunities and consequences are well understood, clearly identified and articulated, including identification of the benefits and outcomes which can be achieved by addressing it. In a stable network, this will simply be maintaining the network to the agreed levels of service, as depicted by existing performance measures.

 

For an Activity Management Plan we would expect to see the following information in order to meet the requirements of the strategic case Is the proposal aligned with the organisation’s strategic context and plans?  The strategic case determines whether or not an investment is needed. It demonstrates the case for change and the strategic assessment of evidence, i.e. how the proposal will further the aims and objectives of the organisation.  .

 

  • Network context including linkages at boundaries and to state highway/local network, and land use
  • Current Levels of Service (which may include mode/time differentiation from a NOF)
  • Government / NZ Transport Agency direction, including relevant legislative context
  • Council environment and periphery strategy set affecting activity and asset management
  • Network management
    • objectives for maintaining and operating network (intervention hierarchy)
    • road hierarchy / road classification (using the One Network Road Classification)
    • current Level of Service targets
  • Existing Evidence Base (evidence gaps can be identified in the improvement plan)

    • Network condition, use and inventory (and other relevant data as required)
    • Level of Service  / customer surveys
    • demand and growth measures, trends and projections
    • age of data, quality, gaps
    • benefit/performance measurement, Key Performance Indicators
  • Assumptions underlying the document and analysis (for example, travel projections, escalation)
  • Efficiency of existing delivery. This may include current spend, whole of life costs, unit costs, procurement, investment strategy, or optimisation
  • Procurement The purchase of works, goods or services. environment - fixed components, constraints and/or opportunities
  • Risks
  • AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
    Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
    Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
    improvement plan for known deficiencies in AMP (if any)
  • List of capital improvements (planned and in progress) for infrastructure (if any)
  • Strategic priorities based on the culmination of above.

 

Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. Business Case

The Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. Business Case represents the conversation of planning and considering all possible interventions – it is an Approved Organisation’s depiction of the planned or future state.

 

The primary purpose of the programme business case is to provide robust evidence that a decision to invest in a programme of works represents best value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. .

 

The programme business case will identify a long list of possible alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options, develop a range of possible programmes, their benefits, consequences and potential costs, and then identify a preferred programme of activities to progress. Any deficiencies in the AMP An activity management plan prepared in accordance with clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, or a similar plan.
Activity management planning considers the assets in the context of the services they are supporting, and clarifies the purpose for holding the asset. The goal of good asset management is to support the delivery of a level of service (whatever the service may be) in the most cost effective manner, taking long term sustainability into account.
Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group's International infrastructure management manual.
(such as evidence base, knowledge gaps) can be corrected either through the articulation of this stage, or as an application to the NLTP A National Land Transport Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. adopted by the NZTA under section 19 of the LTMA, as from time to time amended or varied to improve individual components.

 

The preferred programme is not the maintenance and operations submission; which is developed as a result of these high level decisions and developed for more detail at the later (indicative and detailed) stages of the Business Case.

 

For an Activity Management Plan we would expect to see the following information in order to meet the expectations of the programme business case.

  • Modal priority alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options (where applicable)
  • Service offering alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options, for example – safety, HPMV A truck that carries a divisible load that exceeds a mass of 44,000kg and/or the maximum length dimensions allowed for standard vehicles (As set out in the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Dimensions and Mass 2002). HPMVs operate under HPMV permits issued by a Road Controlling Authority (RCA The Minister, Department of State, Crown entity, state enterprise or territorial authority that controls the road. ) for access to specific roads that have been determined to be suitable to accommodate the additional mass and/or length. , efficiency, tourism, cycling
  • Level of Service alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options
  • Intervention hierarchy
  • Optimisation of existing network
  • Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. development methodology / approach used
  • Affordability considerations (financial implications of the programme alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options)
  • Timing (renewals / improvements)
  • Trade offs
  • Benefit realisation (how effective the alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options are at realising outcomes and benefits)
  • "The offering" of the preferred programme (at a strategic level – detail will be developed in the maintenance, renewals and improvements programmes)

 

 
 

Last Updated: 04/11/2015 12:31pm