Planning & Investment Knowledge Base

TPAC: Work category 002: Transport model development - guidance

 

Introduction

The purpose of transport models is to provide a tool to understand, and plan for, change. This may relate to changes in population, industry, technology, energy and climate.

 

Transport models must be fit for purpose. They need to be strategic and identify future transport needs. Updates to existing models should only be undertaken where there has been significant change A significant change in strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

It includes:
the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


* underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

* the proposing organisation’s objectives.
is:


* a change in planning assumptions in relation to demographic (i.e. population or age profile changes) projections as a result of the next official census, or

* a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

* a need to alter a region's RLTS or RPS to address impacts of projected sea level rises, coastal erosion or significantly increased flood risk in areas where key networks are at risk, or

* a legislative requirement to renew a region's RLTS or RPS.
Significant change pressures within the context of regional growth are:


* a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

* impacts from sea level rise, coastal erosion or significant flood risk from climate change that threatens or is projected to threaten local and or key state highway networks.
on strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

It includes:
the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


* underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

* the proposing organisation’s objectives.
or future projections.  

 

Funding for models or updates will be assessed and prioritised against the NZ Transport Agency Assessment Framework.  

 

 

This definition applies to the 2012-15 NLTP A National Land Transport Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. adopted by the NZTA under section 19 of the LTMA, as from time to time amended or varied .  For the 2015-18 NLTP please refer to the updated definition for work category 002.

 

Requirements for transport models

To receive funding assistance, development of transport models must meet the following requirements:

  • include a detailed Terms of Reference, that complies with section 2.12 of the NZ Transport Agency Economic Evaluation Manual (Jan 2016)
  • identify the purpose of the model or the update of the model
  • include a schedule that specifies when the model will be completed
  • establish a process for peer review by a reviewer approved by the NZ Transport Agency
  • identify a  technical committee with representatives from the affected Approved Organisations and the NZ Transport Agency that will oversee the work
  • ensure a multiparty funding agreement is in place where there is more than one participant

 

Expected outputs Goods or services delivered by an activity or combination of activities. from models

Models will include the following outputs Goods or services delivered by an activity or combination of activities. :

  • information (and/or projections) that will inform and respond to strategic documents (both national and regional)
  • information (and/or projections) that will respond to significant changes impacting on the transport network
  • information that can be used to evaluate alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options that can be used for future planning and investigation activities carried out for state highway, and/or local transport networks
  • clearly identified assumptions, limitations and tolerances which are embedded in the model, and
  • a process to ensure that the model is maintained and updated as required.

 

Examples of qualifying activities

Examples of qualifying activities include:

  • development of upgrading of models that focus on areas where there has been significant change A significant change in strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

    It includes:
    the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


    * underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

    * the proposing organisation’s objectives.
    is:


    * a change in planning assumptions in relation to demographic (i.e. population or age profile changes) projections as a result of the next official census, or

    * a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

    * a need to alter a region's RLTS or RPS to address impacts of projected sea level rises, coastal erosion or significantly increased flood risk in areas where key networks are at risk, or

    * a legislative requirement to renew a region's RLTS or RPS.
    Significant change pressures within the context of regional growth are:


    * a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

    * impacts from sea level rise, coastal erosion or significant flood risk from climate change that threatens or is projected to threaten local and or key state highway networks.
    in the strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

    It includes:
    the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


    * underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

    * the proposing organisation’s objectives.
    such as land use or population growth
  • access maps showing origins to key destinations
  • studies and strategies until July 2015; refer to the following for information on studies and strategies.

 

Exclusions

Exclusions include:

  • maintenance of the model
  • application of the model to transport planning or activity development; these are costs of delivering the relevant activity
  • routine updates to models where there has not been any significant change A significant change in strategic context The Strategic Context represents the alignment of the proposed investment with the business problem owner’s priorities, regional and national priorities, other programmes and strategies and other organisations’ priorities (if relevant).

    It includes:
    the assumptions or view of the future, including transport and population growth, economic and industry change statistics, etc. 


    * underlying/umbrella strategic documents, such as the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport or regional strategies, to position the outcomes sought within the strategic assessment against wider national and regional outcomes.  A problem with perceived significance may be identified in the strategic assessment but, when placed within a wider strategic context, it is acknowledged that it is not of high significance and does not present value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. for investment at this time.

    * the proposing organisation’s objectives.
    is:


    * a change in planning assumptions in relation to demographic (i.e. population or age profile changes) projections as a result of the next official census, or

    * a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

    * a need to alter a region's RLTS or RPS to address impacts of projected sea level rises, coastal erosion or significantly increased flood risk in areas where key networks are at risk, or

    * a legislative requirement to renew a region's RLTS or RPS.
    Significant change pressures within the context of regional growth are:


    * a change in planning assumptions relating to the nature and shape of dominant industries in the region, or

    * impacts from sea level rise, coastal erosion or significant flood risk from climate change that threatens or is projected to threaten local and or key state highway networks.
    in land use and population projections
  • models to identify preferred routes, and
  • Studies and strategies will be excluded from July 2015 except where delivered as part of a Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. business cases under work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

    * activity class 12 – local road improvements
    * activity class 13 – state highways improvements
    004: Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. business case development

 

Funding assistance rates

The usual funding assistance rate for this work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

* activity class 12 – local road improvements
* activity class 13 – state highways improvements
is:

 

 
 

Last Updated: 01/09/2017 4:39pm