Planning & Investment Knowledge Base

TPAC: Work category 003: Activity management planning

 

Introduction

This work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

* activity class 12 – local road improvements
* activity class 13 – state highways improvements
provides for the preparation and improvement of Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. for land transport activities, including supporting studies and models.

 

The NZ Transport Agency expects that proposals for funding assistance for the following types of activities will be based on Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. prepared under clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002

  • improvement and creation of land transport infrastructure
  • network operations and services (including demand management)
  • maintenance of land transport infrastructure, and
  • renewal of land transport infrastructure.

 

The NZ Transport Agency will review new and improved Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. and provide comments to the responsible organisation.

 

This definition applies to the 2012-15 NLTP A National Land Transport Programme Interrelated and complementary combination of activities that, when delivered in a coordinated manner, produce synergies – can span more than one work category and more than one activity class, e.g. a programme could include a road improvement and public transport improvement activities. adopted by the NZTA under section 19 of the LTMA, as from time to time amended or varied .  For the 2015-18 NLTP please refer to the updated definition for work category 003.

 

Examples of qualifying activities

Examples of qualifying activities include, but may not be limited to:

  • enhancement and improvement of:
    • Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe.
    • Regional Public Transport Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. (RPTP A plan which specifies how the regional council intends to give effect to the public transport service components of the regional land transport plan that applies to the region. As of June 2013, the contents and management of the plan is defined by Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003. )
    • Road Safety Action Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. (RSAP Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. developed at the local level to address road safety issues in the area, as a result of the road safety action planning process. )
  • procurement strategies
  • community consultation related to the development of Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. , including RPTPs
  • associated demand forecasting
  • development of levels of service targets and implementation plans
  • asset performance and service gap analysis
  • optimisation process development
  • financial forecasts, and
  • development and improvement of asset deterioration models.

     

Other potential activities that are not in the above list should be discussed with NZ Transport Agency for eligibility.

 

Exclusions

This work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

* activity class 12 – local road improvements
* activity class 13 – state highways improvements
excludes:

  • preparation of transport models – these are funded under Work Category 002: Transport model development
  • option selection or development of an activity – these are part of the cost of the project or activity, and
  • the following, which are funded under Work Category 151: Network and asset management for roads, and under the appropriate public transport services work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

    * activity class 12 – local road improvements
    * activity class 13 – state highways improvements
    for public transport:
    • regular updates to the plan
    • implementation and operation of asset management systems
    • updating asset information
    • application of Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. to activities
    • operation and management of the land transport network
    • roughness and condition rating surveys, and
    • traffic count and congestion congestion is where the volume to capacity ratio exceeds 80% for 5 days per week over at least a 1 hour time period that affects at least 1.5 km of a route.  For information on the volume to capacity ratio, see Appendix A3 of the NZTA's Economic Evaluation Manual surveys.

 

Funding assistance rate

The usual funding assistance rate for qualifying work under this work category A type of activity – not confined to a particular activity class, e.g. new roads (work category 323) appears in:

* activity class 12 – local road improvements
* activity class 13 – state highways improvements
is:

 

Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe.

Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. should be based on the National Asset Management Steering (NAMS) Group’s International infrastructure management manual.

 

An Activity Management Plan should include the following matters:

  • the detail specified in clause 2 of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002
  • an awareness of community views and expectations relating to the use of land transport network
  • evidence of links to regional and national land transport strategies and targets
  • proposed levels of service targets and implementation plans
  • the organisation’s transport demand management strategy, including demand forecasts and the proposed additional asset capacity, non-asset-based solutions (including inter-agency and community initiatives), or changes to service levels and standards
  • life-cycle management strategies
  • current asset value, annual depreciation, asset condition and expected asset lives
  • major risks and a risk management strategy (including safety and sustainability issues)
  • how best value for money Selecting the right things to do, implementing them in the right way, at the right time and for the right price. will be achieved in the delivery of its land transport services.
  • the organisation’s procurement strategy A document required by the NZTA that sets out each approved organisation's strategy for procuring services and infrastructure using funds from the National Land Transport Fund. for the activities in the plan
  • the organisation’s decision-making and prioritisation process for including activities in an RLTP A regional land transport plan, prepared under Part 2 of the LTMA, as from time to time amended or varied.
  • a detailed list of activities for the first three years and an outline of actions for the following seven years
  • a financial plan that is clearly linked to an RLTP A regional land transport plan, prepared under Part 2 of the LTMA, as from time to time amended or varied. and a Long Term Plan (LTP Long-term council plan in accordance with section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002. ) or Annual Plan
  • how the performance and use of the network is monitored, and
  • indications of the completeness and accuracy of asset information, assumptions and financial projections.

 

Regional Public Transport Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe.

An RPTP A plan which specifies how the regional council intends to give effect to the public transport service components of the regional land transport plan that applies to the region. As of June 2013, the contents and management of the plan is defined by Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003. is prepared by an Approved Organisation that has the functions, powers and duties of a regional council.

 

An RPTP A plan which specifies how the regional council intends to give effect to the public transport service components of the regional land transport plan that applies to the region. As of June 2013, the contents and management of the plan is defined by Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.  must take into account NZ Transport Agency guidelines for the preparation of RPTPs.

 

Road Safety Action Plan

An RSAP Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. developed at the local level to address road safety issues in the area, as a result of the road safety action planning process. is a tool for coordinating the implementation of inter-agency road safety strategies. The plans are an effective implementation tool to integrate activities that minimise road trauma, and can be used to support applications for funding projects and programmes.

 

Partners participating will include Approved Organisations, the NZ Transport Agency, NZ Police The police of New Zealand within the meaning of the Police Act 1958. and Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). Local government agencies are the identified organisations that prepare and manage RSAPs.

 

RSAPs must be developed from an inter-agency perspective and contain:

  • an evidence-based assessment of existing safety issues that are being addressed
  • the individual activities that will be delivered
  • the objectives and outcomes for each activity (including expected achievement against regional targets)
  • a list of the partners that will participate in the activities
  • a monitoring programme and post-implementation evaluation of effectiveness
  • a list of supportive policies, strategies and plans (including regional and local road safety strategies and activity management plans).

 

Regular RSAP Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. developed at the local level to address road safety issues in the area, as a result of the road safety action planning process. meetings enable monitoring of service delivery and progress towards the achievement of outcomes.

 

Terms of reference

Applications for funding for the preparation or improvement Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. must provide the terms of reference for the NZ Transport Agency to approve. The minimum information the terms of reference must cover for the application, is:

  • Reason for the preparation or improvement of the plan:
    • statement of purpose for plan development (or supporting study or strategy)
    • context and scope for the task(s)
    • activities to be covered (including demand management, network operations,
    • public transport, infrastructure improvements, community engagement, performance monitoring)
    • background/reference documentation for the task(s)
    • relationships with higher-level policies, strategies and plans (including government and regional strategies and policies), and
    • relationship to land-use policies and development activities (includes those that are planned and in progress)

  • How the funding is to be used:
    • issues to be addressed
    • modes to be considered, with reasons
    • method used, including modelling, project management and process for political engagement
    • possible alternatives A strategic option that may encompass a mix of modes and/or high level routes and/or land use options. Alternatives would be considered during strategy development, with the preferred alternative being selected and taken through into package and project development. and options to be considered (including demand management, education, enforcement, asset disposal)
    • a timeframe for the plan development, with realistic allowance for consultation and a clear completion point
    • estimated cost of completing the task(s)
    • parties involved, and
    • how the plan development (or supporting study or strategy) is to be procured

  • Outcomes and deliverables:
    • deliverables/outputs Goods or services delivered by an activity or combination of activities.
    • expected outcomes of the plan development
    • process for sign-off by the Approved Organisation (or the NZ Transport Agency for state highway activities), and
    • process for peer review

 

Change of scope

Any change of scope must be approved by the NZ Transport Agency before authority to proceed is issued to the professional services Technical inputs to an activity undertaken by persons skilled in fields relevant to that activity. supplier.

 

The NZ Transport Agency will check the coverage and outputs Goods or services delivered by an activity or combination of activities. of plans against their agreed terms of reference.

 

Continuous improvement of activity management plans

The NZ Transport Agency expects Approved Organisations and the NZ Transport Agency (state highways) to have a programme of improvement for their Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. . They should address issues arising from:

  • internal reviews of the plans and the processes
  • benchmarking Benchmarking is undertaken when the NZTA makes comparisons against similar regions and the national average. A lack of information supporting differences from regional and national averages may result in changes to the efficiency rating for public transport or maintenance programme or a requirement for a study as a condition of investment approval. Trends in these measures over time are used rather than just annual values. of plans, processes and outputs Goods or services delivered by an activity or combination of activities. with those of similar Approved Organisations
  • findings of audits of plans and processes.

 

The programme of improvement must ensure that Activity Management Plans Plans describe the tactics to give effect to a strategy. They are specific in content, action oriented and outputs focussed, resulting in a tangible set of activities to be delivered within a clear timeframe. and processes efficiently provide a robust and realistic rationale for future works programmes.

 

NZ Transport Agency expectations

Approved Organisations and the NZ Transport Agency(state highways) must maintain the following priorities in their activity management plans:

  • Achievement of a high level of data integrity. This includes:
    • asset inventory
    • treatment history
    • condition data
    • cost data
    • traffic data.
  • Decision-making methods for optimising asset treatments over the network and over time. Treatment decisions should recognise:
    • the life-cycle costs of treatments
    • the effect of the treatments on asset condition throughout the life cycle
    • how the treatments impact on road system performance.

 

Only once confidence in these elements is complete should organisations consider moving onto advanced predictive methods of long-term planning.

 

Asset deterioration models

Performance prediction modelling can be used to assist the forecasting needed for forward activities. Modelling of future condition must be adapted to local conditions due to the complex range of:

  • materials used
  • pavement The road structure that is constructed on the subgrade and supports the traffic loading. types and conditions, and
  • climate and traffic loadings.

Even with local calibration, performance prediction modelling is not definitive. Forecasts of pavement The road structure that is constructed on the subgrade and supports the traffic loading. condition and estimates of life-cycle costs must recognise the limitations of the many assumptions involved.

 
 

Last Updated: 22/02/2017 9:27am